Does an increased number of cesarean sections result in greater risk for mother and baby in low-risk, late preterm and term deliveries?

Maternal and neonatal outcomes of repeated Cesarean section

  • Necati Hancerliogullari
  • Selen Yaman
  • Rifat Taner Aksoy
  • Aytekin Tokmak
Keywords: Cesarean delivery, Intraperitoneal adhesions, Maternal morbidity, Neonatal outcomes, Operative complications, Placenta previa, Repeat cesarean section

Abstract

Objective: To compare surgical complications and maternal and neonatal outcomes of low-risk, late preterm and term pregnant women who have had one or two previous cesarean sections (CSs) with those who have had three or more CSs.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of 850 patients undergoing repeat CS at a tertiary level maternity hospital in Ankara, Turkey. Of those, 380 had previously undergone one or two CSs (Group-I: second or third CS) and 470 had previously undergone three or four CSs (Group-II: fourth or fifth CS). Outcomes and complications were compared between the groups.

Results: The two groups were statistically significantly different in terms of maternal age, parity, body mass index, maternal weight gain during pregnancy, and length of hospital stay (all p<0.001). Although the prevalence of intraperitoneal adhesions and placenta previa was higher in Group-II than in Group-I (p<0.001), there was no statistically significant difference in terms of cesarean hysterectomy and adjacent organ injuries (p>0.05). There were also no significant differences between the groups in terms of neonatal outcomes (p>0.05).

Conclusion: Although the increase in the number of CSs appears to be associated with intraperitoneal adhesions and placenta previa, adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes were not observed in those women with low-risk pregnancies who underwent CS for the fourth or fifth time. Therefore, fourth and fifth CSs may be considered relatively safe surgical procedures in this cohort.

How to cite this:
Hancerliogullari N, Yaman S, Aksoy RT, Tokmak A. Does an increased number of cesarean sections result in greater risk for mother and baby in low-risk, late preterm and term deliveries? Pak J Med Sci. 2019;35(1):---------.
doi: https://doi.org/10.12669/pjms.35.1.364

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Published
2019-01-12
Section
Original Articles